Contents insurance explained – Which?

Home contents insurance covers the cost of replacing your belongings in your home if they are damaged, destroyed, or stolen.

As a general rule, your “contents” are the items you would take with you if you moved house.

Reading: What is the best home insurance policy

These include, but are not limited to:

  • furniture: bed, sofa, wardrobe, dining table and chair
  • kitchenware: cutlery, kitchen utensils, microwaves and kettles
  • entertainment: video games, toys, dvds and cds
  • decoration: cushions, curtains and bedding
  • electrical: televisions, laptops and game consoles
  • clothing and jewelry
  • decorations and antiques
  • Contents insurance can be purchased as a stand-alone policy or as part of a homeowners insurance policy combined with buildings insurance.

    here, we reveal the best contents insurance policies. If you’re looking for tips on getting cheap contents insurance, check out our guide.

    comparison of contents insurance policies

    We have analyzed 58 contents insurance policies from dozens of providers. click on the provider’s name to get detailed ratings and reviews.

    Members can log in to see the results of our analysis. if you are not a member yet, join which one? and get full access to these results and all of our reviews.

    how does content insurance work?

    There are three main types of contents insurance policy:

    qualified by bedroom

    A room-rated policy uses the number of rooms in your home to calculate the amount of contents coverage you get.

    sum insured

    A sum assured policy requires you to calculate the amount of contents coverage you need.

    unlimited sum insured

    an unlimited sum insured policy covers all your contents without any limits, so you don’t have to worry about being underinsured.

    See also: What do i need to apply for health insurance

    find out more: read our reviews of home insurance providers

    content insurance claim

    For all types of home insurance, if you need to make a claim, your provider will settle it on a “new for old” or “indemnity” basis.

    • new for old coverage means your home insurer will pay for a new product of equal value if your insured item is damaged or stolen.
    • indemnity coverage takes into account wear and tear on the items you claim, which reduces the payment you’ll get. For example, while it may cost £800 to replace your sofa, you may only get £150 if it’s 10 years old with rips and stains.
    • Because new-for-old payouts tend to be higher, they can be more expensive than indemnity policies.

      content insurance and work from home

      If you, like many people, have had to set up a home office since the start of the pandemic, this could have implications for your contents insurance.

      Computer-based administrative work is generally covered. You generally don’t need to notify homeowners insurers if you’re doing more of this at home instead of the office.

      If you’ve taken expensive equipment home from your workplace, that should be covered by your employer’s business insurance, so again, you don’t need to tell your insurer.

      >

      However, if you’ve purchased new equipment or furniture yourself, you may need to increase your content coverage limit to account for it. You can do this by contacting your insurer online or by phone.

      You should check with your insurer if your job is not computer-based, if you have business visitors at home, or if you have inventory at home.

      content insurance calculator

      Before you start looking for contents insurance quotes, you need to estimate the value of your belongings.

      Our contents insurance calculator will help you calculate the total cost of your possessions.

      Simply enter the value of your items in each room.

      what are the common exclusions for contents insurance?

      There are a number of exclusions that are likely to apply to your contents insurance policy. these include, but are not limited to:

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      See also: Travel Insurance – Fit for Travel

      See also: What is a Deductible in Health insurance? | Expats Blog

      Should renters get contents insurance?

      When you rent a home, the landlord is responsible for insuring the building and fixtures, so if there is a broken pipe or boiler problem, ask the landlord to fix the problem as soon as possible. covered by your policy.

      If your apartment is furnished by your landlord, it is your responsibility to insure your own contents as well.

      However, you will need to obtain separate contents insurance if you wish to cover your own personal possessions.

      Depending on your living situation, you may be able to get contents insurance for the entire property or just your room.

      If you decide to insure the entire flat or shared dwelling, be aware that being the named person on a policy can have unintended consequences. If, for example, your housemate makes a claim, it will affect everyone else’s premium when it comes to renewal, even if it was her fault alone.

      Your claims record can follow you for up to five years, so even if you move and change home insurance providers, you may still have to report the incident, which will increase your premium.

      If you decide to opt for room only insurance, you will need to have a lock on the door to be eligible for theft coverage.

      If there are no signs of forced entry into your room, your claim may be denied. belongings in common areas are also unlikely to be covered unless there is a sign of forced entry into your home.